Airbus’s Leap Towards Zero-Emission Flight with MBSE

In the dynamic field of aerospace engineering, the integration of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and simulation within Airbus Operations SAS is explored through the lens of the Zero-E program, which aims to revolutionize the industry with zero-emission aviation.

By Garima DHASMANA

n the dynamic field of aerospace engineering, the integration of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and simulation within Airbus Operations SAS is explored through the lens of the Zero-E program, which aims to revolutionize the industry with zero-emission aviation. The role of a modeling and simulation architect is critical in overseeing the challenges associated with the adoption of these innovative methodologies. With the growing maturity of MBSE, the emphasis is placed on the seamless acceptance and utilization of new methods by designers and engineers. A strategic partnership with Dassault Systèmes is highlighted as a key element in customizing and optimizing tools to fit the unique processes of Airbus.

Mathieu Crespo’s Role in Airbus’s Zero-E Program

At Airbus Operations SAS, Mathieu Crespo holds the pivotal position of modeling and simulation architect for the Zero-E program. The Zero-E program embodies Airbus’s commitment to pioneering a zero-emission future in aviation, and Crespo’s role involves overseeing all aspects of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and simulation.

The main challenge faced in this role is the adoption of new MBSE methodologies by end-users, including designers and various Airbus personnel. To address this challenge and improve user acceptance, a close collaboration with Dassault Systèmes is fostered to customize and integrate Dassault’s tools effectively within Airbus’s processes. The core of MBSE at Airbus is built around CATIA Magic and Cameo Systems Modeller, complemented by the integration of requirements through a third-party solution.

The core of MBSE lies in tools such as CATIA Magic or Cameo Systems Modeller, which are heavily relied upon to model architectures and integrate requirements with third-party solutions. The primary objective is to gain control over the complex systems being developed, safeguarding the safety of the designs while coping with increasing complexity.

Attaining the same level of performance in designs and products is considered a milestone of satisfaction before evaluating the return on investment post-deployment. The acknowledgment of these efforts indicates a strategic approach to ensure that complex systems meet the rigorous demands of safety and performance in the contemporary engineering landscape.

On the MBSE part, the heart is really CATIA Magic or Cameo System Modeller on which we make a lot of efforts to try to model our architectures.Mathieu Crespo, Modeling and Simulation Architect, Airbus Operation SAS

Anticipating the Strategic Impact of MBSE on Future Aerospace Outcomes

In the realm of aerospace design and engineering, the anticipation of maintaining current performance levels amidst rising complexity is seen as a fundamental satisfaction point. The commitment to master complex systems while preserving the safety and integrity of designs remains a priority. The incorporation of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) has ushered in a new era of architecture modeling, linking requirements with analysis and simulations, all managed through advanced platforms.

The expectation is that, upon successful deployment, the ROI will reflect the efficacy of customizing and optimizing these tools for their application in aerospace design. While the present goal is to sustain performance levels, the future-oriented vision anticipates an increased efficiency and productivity through collaborative efforts, consequently impacting Airbus populations positively.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the integration of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) within the aerospace sector is emphasized as a strategic approach to managing increasingly complex systems. Customization and effective collaboration with software providers are imperative to ensure the acceptance and usability of new methodologies by end-users.

Core tools such as CATIA Magic or Cameo Systems Modeller, and third-party solutions are at the heart of these efforts, modeling architectures and integrating requirements to maintain safety and performance in designs